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Article
July 5, 1913

LANGE'S COLLOIDAL GOLD CHLORID TEST ON THE CEREBROSPINAL FLUID IN CONGENITAL SYPHILIS

Author Affiliations

CHICAGO

From the Laboratory of the Presbyterian Hospital, Chicago.

JAMA. 1913;61(1):13-15. doi:10.1001/jama.1913.04350010015005
Abstract

Anyone who had much experience with the Wassermann reaction and other laboratory tests as applied to diagnosis of congenital syphilis must feel that such reactions are entirely inadequate, and this especially applies to those cases in which they are most needed, that is, in very young infants.

Zsigmondy1 has shown that certain albuminous bodies when brought in contact with a solution of colloidal gold in the presence of an electrolyte, would, in certain concentrations, cause a clumping together of the small collodial particles producing various changes in color and even precipitation. He also found that when these albuminous substances were in less dilute solutions they possessed a protecting power which prevented precipitation.

Furthermore, it was noted that the point at which protection ceased and precipitation began was different for each albumin. Lange, therefore, concluded to try the effect of spinal fluids on colloidal gold solutions.

Very shortly Lange found that when

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