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Article
July 5, 1913

THE JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN MEDICAL ASSOCIATION

JAMA. 1913;61(1):42-45. doi:10.1001/jama.1913.04350010044019
Abstract

THE FATE OF INGESTED PROTEIN  Although the form in which protein is absorbed from the lumen of the intestine is fairly well understood, the fate of the products of its alimentary breakdown is by no means so clear. Recently we referred to some of the experimental evidence on the travels of the aminoacids in the circulation to the tissues and their ultimate conversion to urea.1 Quite irrespective of the form in which the nitrogenous material is conveyed to the tissues, the speedy occurrence of an increased elimination of nitrogenous substance in the urine after a meal of protein is undeniably suggestive that somewhere there is a prompt disintegration of nitrogen-yielding compounds. It is by no means necessary to assume that the post-prandial increase of urinary urea is derived directly from the material ingested at the meal, for it is also conceivable that the nitrogenous waste arises from the

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