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Article
August 23, 1913

TEACHING OF OTOLARYNGOLOGY: REPORT OF COMMITTEE APPOINTED TO CONSIDER THE BEST METHODS TO BE FOLLOWED IN THE TEACHING OF OTOLARYNGOLOGY IN UNDERGRADUATE AND POSTGRADUATE SCHOOLS.

Author Affiliations

TORONTO; WASHINGTON, D. C.; PHILADELPHIA

JAMA. 1913;61(8):535-537. doi:10.1001/jama.1913.04350080011004
Abstract

Committee of the Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society  The subject assigned to us for our deliberation naturally divides itself into two distinct parts, and yet, in the final analysis, the postgraduate teaching is closely dependent on the thoroughness of the undergraduate work.

TEACHING OF OTOLARYNGOLOGY TO UNDERGRADUATES  In order to ascertain what methods are followed and what views are held in the various leading universities of this continent on this question, your committee submitted a series of questions to the professors of otolaryngology in forty of the leading institutions, the list of these being compiled from the Carnegie Foundation Bulletin 4, entitled "Medical Education in the United States and Canada."The questions were as follows:1. Should the "course of instruction" be extended over one or two years?2. How many hours should be devoted to this "course of instruction?"3. What proportion should be clinical and what didactic?4.

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