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Article
September 6, 1913

EPIDEMIC STREPTOCOCCUS SORE THROAT —ITS SYMPTOMS, ORIGIN AND TRANSMISSION

JAMA. 1913;61(10):723-724. doi:10.1001/jama.1913.04350100001001
Abstract

Epidemics of streptococcus sore throat have recently sprung up as a scourge, so new that they receive no mention even in the latest editions of our text-books.

Within two years three extensive and alarming epidemics have occurred, which have no counterpart in American medical history. In some respects they call to mind the first severe invasion of influenza, but the latter disease spread everywhere throughout the country, whereas each of the streptococcus sore throat outbreaks was confined to a single community.

It is quite probable, however, that many of our local tonsillitis epidemics, loosely designated as "grip," have in reality been due to streptococcus.

In England comparatively small outbreaks of "septic sore throat" have been described1 in seventeen localities, and a probable relationship to the milk-supply has been recognized; but in few instances were careful bacteriologic investigations carried out. The streptococcus was first demonstrated in cultures obtained from cases

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