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Article
September 27, 1913

TRACHOMA AMONG THE NATIVES OF THE MOUNTAINS OF EASTERN KENTUCKY

Author Affiliations

LEXINGTON, KY.

JAMA. 1913;61(13_part_2):1116-1124. doi:10.1001/jama.1913.04350140032008
Abstract

For more than twenty-five years, a large and rapidly increasing number of cases of trachoma, with many of the devastating sight-destroying sequelae, have been coming to me from the mountains of eastern Kentucky. I was impressed with the genuineness, the simplicity, honesty and sincerity of the large majority of those so afflicted—and the fact that very few of them had the first rudiments of a common school education, indeed, few of them could read or write, and many were unfamiliar with the alphabet. Often I would see the patients only once—there being no funds to maintain them or provision of any kind available for keeping them in the hospital for treatment. After a few months many of them would return with complete destruction of the eye or with impaired vision beyond restoration.

Besides this class of cases many were brought with most extensive and complicated suppuration and destruction of the

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