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October 18, 1913

RADIUM IN INTERNAL MEDICINE: ITS PHYSIOLOGIC AND PHARMACOLOGIC EFFECTS

Author Affiliations

BALTIMORE

From the Pharmacological Laboratory, Johns Hopkins University, and the Chemical Division of the Medical Clinic, Johns Hopkins Hospital.

JAMA. 1913;61(16):1438-1442. doi:10.1001/jama.1913.04350170020006
Abstract

Considerable has already been learned concerning the effects exerted by radium in its many forms on various physiologic and pathologic processes and conditions. Sufficient data, however, are not at hand to make this chapter in any way complete. Much more evidence is necessary before the findings of certain investigators can be considered properly established, while in other directions entire spheres of its influence are probably overlooked in our at present early acquaintance with radium and its activity. The briefest outline of the theories, facts and data as they appear in the literature relating to radium in internal medicine are here presented.

Uric Acid Metabolism.—Gudzent asserts that the lactim form of monosodium urate (the form present in gout) is converted in vitro by radium into the more soluble tautomeric or isomeric lactam form which in turn is broken up into ammonia and carbon dioxid. Neither Lazarus nor Wiechowski was able

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