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Article
October 25, 1913

HOLDING FRACTURES WITH ABSORBABLE MATERIAL—IVORY PLATES AND SCREWS: A NEW METHOD

JAMA. 1913;61(17):1514-1516. doi:10.1001/jama.1913.04350180014005
Abstract

Since 1908, while working in the research laboratories of the University of Pennsylvania, at the problem of lengthening shortened bones of the leg, I have been trying to devise some method of holding fractures by inserting into the fractured bone some retention apparatus which would not act as a foreign body, and which would be absorbable by the surrounding structures, eliminating the necessity of subsequent removal, which is so often necessary when steel is used. In our experiments1 we found that ivory was very acceptable to human bones, did not cause softening of the surrounding bone, was gradually absorbed and did not become loose, since the bone grows in as the ivory is absorbed. The ivory also has the property of being strong enough to stand any strain the muscles attached to the broken fragments may put on it.2 It was a simple matter, therefore, to devise ivory

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