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Article
November 8, 1913

VERRUGA PERUVIANA, OROYA FEVER AND UTA: PRELIMINARY REPORT OF THE FIRST EXPEDITION TO SOUTH AMERICA FROM THE DEPARTMENT OF TROPICAL MEDICINE OF HARVARD UNIVERSITY

Author Affiliations

Professor of Tropical Medicine, Harvard University; Assistant Professor of Pathology, Harvard University; Instructor in Economic Entomology, Harvard University BOSTON; Instructor in Clinical Medicine, Johns Hopkins University BALTIMORE; Director Municipal Laboratory of Hygiene LIMA, PERU

JAMA. 1913;61(19):1713-1716. doi:10.1001/jama.1913.04350200039013
Abstract

The expedition was undertaken for the purpose of investigating certain obscure forms of tropical disease in South America, particularly verruga peruviana, as well as with the idea of collecting material to be used for the instruction of students in the various courses of tropical medicine to be inaugurated at Harvard University in November of the present year. After proceeding to Colon and Panama we continued down the west coast of South America to Buenaventura, Colombia, and thence to Guayaquil. In Buenaventura, Guayaquil and the vicinity, material relating to biting insects, animal parasites, caraate, frambesia, plague, malaria and particularly yellow fever was collected. The studies carried on in relation to these localities will be considered in the complete report of the expedition to be made at a later date.

From Guayaquil we proceeded to Peru, where at Lima, and in a number of the mountain towns in the interior, the major

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