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Article
November 22, 1913

RUPTURE OF THE SIGMOID BY AN AIR-BLAST OF 120 POUNDS PRESSURE

Author Affiliations

Shelby, N. C. Surgeon of the Shelby Hospital

JAMA. 1913;61(21):1898-1899. doi:10.1001/jama.1913.04350220042016
Abstract

On May 8, 1913, a mill-boy sneaked behind the patient and played an air-hose on the rectum as he was leaning over his "doffer's box." The injured boy dropped at once and lost consciousness immediately. The air-blast was 120 pounds pressure to the square inch. Dr. W. H. Hauser of Cherryville called me into consultation the next day. The patient was moved to the hospital twenty hours after the accident. At the consultation and on admission his abdomen was distended and tender, with some rigidity of the muscles. No blood was passed by the rectum. He vomited food and nourishment. A rapid hard pulse (120) of small volume and a temperature of 100 degrees was noted.

Through a left rectus incision under chloroform, the abdominal cavity was found full of blood with a slight odor. The upper portion of the rectum and all of a very redundant sigmoid were split

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