[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
November 29, 1913

THE SELECTION OF HOSPITAL EMPLOYEES UNDER CIVIL SERVICE RULES

Author Affiliations

Examiner Municipal Civil Service Commission NEW YORK

JAMA. 1913;61(22):1967-1969. doi:10.1001/jama.1913.04350230021008
Abstract

INTRODUCTION  The underlying principle of the civil service regulations is that the best shall serve the state. The merit system, as it is called, strives to prevent the hospital superintendent from selecting his personal friends for positions in the hospital service and seeks to prevent him also from appointing those who are merely recommended to him by acquaintances. Under the merit system every citizen has a right to file an application whenever a vacancy occurs in a hospital, and the applicant who fulfils in the most satisfactory manner the requirements of the civil service rules is appointed. In this way the state obtains the service not merely of those who may be or may not be efficient, but also of the best available men and women.

THE COMPETITIVE CLASS  For purposes of administration employees are divided into several classes under the civil service. The most important class is the competitive

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×