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Article
December 13, 1913

ETIOLOGY OF ARTIFICIAL FEEDING: A PLEA FOR THE STUDY OF BREAST-MILK PROBLEMS

Author Affiliations

Assistant Professor of Infantile Dietetics, Medico-Chirurgical College; Pediatrist to the Mount Sinai Hospital; Assistant Pediatrist to the Medico-Chirurgical Hospital and to the Philadelphia General Hospital PHILADELPHIA

JAMA. 1913;61(24):2124-2130. doi:10.1001/jama.1913.04350250010004
Abstract

The title of my paper expresses the desire that prompts its presentation—a wish to discuss, from actual clinical experience and from general observation, the reasons that lead up to a discontinuance of breast-feeding and which, therefore, bring about the institution of artificial feeding, and to prove that these reasons are usually fallacious. I shall not deal in statistics or cite classified groups of cases, but simply present the impressions which I have gained while following a clinical experience culled from private practice and from a comparatively large hospital clientele. The type of patients considered embraces a mixture of all classes, from the poverty-stricken alien who has but recently come to our shores to the infant of the rich surrounded with every luxury that the best city or suburban home can afford. The question is asked of every mother who presents an artificially reared babe or one on whom artificial rearing

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