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Article
January 26, 1918

FLUID SUBSTITUTES FOR TRANSFUSION AFTER HEMORRHAGE: FIRST COMMUNICATION

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK

From the Laboratories of the Rockefeller Institute for Medical Research.

JAMA. 1918;70(4):219-222. doi:10.1001/jama.1918.02600040017005
Abstract

There exists at present a great and urgent need for an injection fluid that can be satisfactorily employed instead of blood for transfusion in cases of hemorrhage. It is common knowledge that casualty clearing stations, after a "push," are crowded with men who have lost too much blood to be operated on, who cannot be revived by means of salt solution and supportive measures, but who would undoubtedly respond to transfusion. For the latter neither time nor donors are available.

A number of fluid substitutes for transfusion have recently been suggested. Our work relates, first, to what may be expected of a substitute, and, second, to the relative merits of some of the substitutes proposed.

THE LIMITS OF SUBSTITUTION FOR HEMOGLOBIN  That severe acute hemorrhage, even to apparent exsanguination, does not entail permanent damage to the organism is shown by the rapid and complete recovery that usually follows transfusion. May

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