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Article
February 2, 1918

THE DIAGNOSIS OF INFARCTION OF THE ENTIRE SPLEEN

Author Affiliations

JANESVILLE, WIS.

JAMA. 1918;70(5):282-285. doi:10.1001/jama.1918.02600050004002
Abstract

Total infarction1 or necrosis of the spleen has received little attention in medical literature. Even the larger systems of medicine devote only a line to its consideration. From scattered reports of colliquative necrosis, coagulation necrosis, thrombosis of the splenic vein, etc., it is evident that a definite symptomatology is associated with these specific affections of the spleen. The purpose of this paper, in addition to adding four instances of total infarction or necrosis of the spleen to the literature, is to point out the possibility of the diagnosis of this condition.

The symptoms are pain, tenderness in the left hypochondrium, enlargement of the spleen, occasionally fever, and vomiting of blood due to rupture of dilated gastric veins. A glance at the literature reveals the regularity with which these symptoms are recorded. The added examples in this report are a repetition of the former.

Whenever the spleen becomes totally infarcted,

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