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Article
February 16, 1918

NATIONAL LICENSURE FOR PHYSICIANS IN THE FEDERAL SERVICE

Author Affiliations

U. S. Army.

JAMA. 1918;70(7):480. doi:10.1001/jama.1918.02600070054020

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Abstract

To the Editor:  —I wish to voice the opinion of almost every physician with whom I have conversed on the granting of national licensure to all physicians in the medical service of the U. S. Army or Navy, enlisted in the Medical Reserve Corps, National Guard or regular Medical Corps. These men should be granted the privilege of practicing medicine in any place in the United States at the end of the war, without taking a state board examination. In my conversation with officers some say that they do not know whether or not they will go back to the place from which they came. Others, younger men, argue that they had not been given the time to take their state board examinations in the state in which they want to practice, but took them where they were taking their internship, and that that state does not reciprocate with their

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