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Article
March 2, 1918

THE URINARY TRACT IN PULMONARY TUBERCULOSIS: A REPORT OF THE STUDY OF SIX HUNDRED CASES

Author Affiliations

Professor of Clinical Surgery and Director of Genito-Urinary Division, Fordham University School of Medicine; Visiting Genito-Urinary Surgeon, Sea View and Sydenham Hospitals; Instructors of Genito-Urinary Surgery, Fordham University School of Medicine; Assistant Visiting Genito-Urinary Surgeons, Sea View Hospital NEW YORK

JAMA. 1918;70(9):591-593. doi:10.1001/jama.1918.02600090011005
Abstract

For years we have had forced on our attention, at frequent intervals, the question of the relative value of surgical and medical treatment of tuberculosis of the kidney, and of the true significance of the various symptoms and signs on the presence or absence of which the diagnosis of this condition is made. We frequently see patients who apply for relief of advanced tuberculosis of the second kidney, very shortly after the first kidney had been removed for tuberculous involvement. In the Sea View Hospital alone, since 1913, we have seen at least twentyfive such patients who were admitted within eight to twelve weeks after the nephrectomy.

This problem cannot be dismissed with the statement that "a kidney which is practically destroyed and which acts as a focus for dissemination of the disease, and the toxins generated in which irritate the second kidney during their elimination, should be removed—the second

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