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Article
March 16, 1918

SACRAL TABES WITH THE CLINICAL PICTURE OF A LESION OF THE CONUS MEDULLARIS: REPORT OF CASE

Author Affiliations

Attending Neurologist, Cook County Hospital; CHICAGO

JAMA. 1918;70(11):755-757. doi:10.1001/jama.1918.02600110013003
Abstract

In tabes dorsalis, the pathologic changes are usually confined to the posterior roots of the dorsolumbar region. Such a localization of the morbid process very well explains the classical signs and symptoms of this disease, as loss of knee jerks, shooting pains, and disorders of sensibility in the lower limbs. Yet there are cases of tabes in which the lesion principally affects the cervical, the lumbar or the sacral regions, and it was customary with the older authors to classify various forms of tabes according to its localization. Thus they differentiated cervical, dorsal, lumbar and sacral tabes. As a rule, however, such a classification does not always hold good, as the symptomatology of tabes is mostly due to scattered or, as Redlich1 pointed out, to segment-like lesions of the cerebrospinal system, as evidenced, for instance, by the simultaneous occurrence, in the majority of tabes cases, of lost tendon reflexes,

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