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Article
March 23, 1918

THE PRINCIPLES OF TREATMENT IN MERCURIC CHLORID POISONING: AN EXPERIMENTAL STUDY

Author Affiliations

CHICAGO

From the Otho S. A. Sprague Memorial Institute, Laboratory of Clinical Research, Rush Medical College.

JAMA. 1918;70(12):824-828. doi:10.1001/jama.1918.02600120004002
Abstract

The passage through the body of very large quantities of water by sustained intravenous injections of glucose at supertolerant rates has been observed to result in a marked flushing out of urea, chlorids and other substances that are capable of excretion by way of the kidneys. It would seem rational to anticipate that this procedure might perhaps have clinical value in hastening the excretion of certain water soluble poisons. The idea of an actual flusing out of poisons by the production and maintenance of hyperdiuresis is an old one. It has been emphasized by M. H. Fisher,1 who used particularly saline solutions, and by Turrettini,2 who reported favorably on the use of intravenous glucose injections in mercuric chlorid poisoning. In connection with other work on the effects of sustained intravenous injections of sugar, salts, etc., at different rates, experiments have been made in this laboratory for the purpose of ascertaining

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