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Article
March 23, 1918

ARMY CARDIOVASCULAR EXAMINATIONS: A CLASSIFICATION OF ABNORMALITIES WITH REFERENCE TO REJECTION, ACCEPTANCE, OR SPECIAL SERVICE OF RECRUITS

Author Affiliations

Recently Contract Surgeon and Cardiovascular Examiner, United States Army BROOKLYN

JAMA. 1918;70(12):844-846. doi:10.1001/jama.1918.26010120002012
Abstract

The work on which these comments are based was in two parts: The first part was a final cardiovascular survey of about 25,000 national guardsmen at Pelham Bay and Camp Mills, both of which were tent camps, requiring about six weeks for its performance. The guardsmen were also examined for tuberculosis, but I confine this paper to the heart work. The second part of the work was the service rendered by my colleagues and myself as members of the cardiovascular consulting board at Camp Upton, a cantonment of the National Army, during a period of four weeks covering the arrival of the fourth increment of the first draft.

METHODS OF EXAMINATION  At Pelham Bay and Camp Mills the number of examiners varied from five to twelve, according to need. The necessity was great, and in both camps the work was pushed with the utmost speed, under the command of Major

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