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Article
March 30, 1918

RESPIRATION AND THE CARBON DIOXID CAPACITY OF THE BLOOD

JAMA. 1918;70(13):924-925. doi:10.1001/jama.1918.02600130028011
Abstract

The more recent study of what is commonly termed acidosis has shown that the underlying phenomena that may be postulated to explain it are far more diverse and complex than was formerly assumed. The original conception was primarily concerned with the excessive production of acid in some form or other in the body. Subsequent investigations have made it clear that the organism has an unexpectedly large capacity for maintaining its neutrality, despite the appearance of unusual quantities of acid. This forms one of the conspicuous factors of safety. One acid factor is constantly present in the form of the continually produced carbon dioxid. It is carried away from the cells in the tissue fluids and blood in solution as sodium bicarbonate, and the excess can be promptly eliminated through the process of breathing, thanks to the usual responsiveness of the respiratory center to even the slightest increment in acidity in

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