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Article
April 20, 1918

VACCINATION AGAINST EXPERIMENTAL POLIOMYELITIS: PRELIMINARY NOTE

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK

From the Bureau of Laboratories, Department of Health, City of New York.

JAMA. 1918;70(16):1142-1143. doi:10.1001/jama.1918.02600160012004
Abstract

Efforts leading to the development of a practicable method for protection against acute poliomyelitis have thus far been very poorly rewarded.

Flexner and Lewis,1 in 1910, showed that monkeys could be immunized against poliomyelitis by repeated subcutaneous injections of increasing amounts of crude unmodified virus over a period of two and onehalf months. These animals, after a further ten days, were injected intracerebrally with 2 c.c. of a filtrate of a highly potent virus, of which from 0.05 to 0.1 c.c. would prove fatal. The immunized animal therefore resisted from twenty to forty fatal doses. In a later report, they state that artificial active immunity either by the injection of a single large dose or by a series of increasing small doses of crude virus over a period of time is not uniformly successful. In the former method, some of the animals developed poliomyelitis as a result of the

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