[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 18.207.255.49. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
June 8, 1918

A STUDY OF FOUR HUNDRED POST-MORTEM WASSERMANN REACTIONS: SUPPLEMENTARY REPORT

Author Affiliations

Acting Assistant Surgeon, United States Public Health Service LOUISVILLE, KY.

From the Pathological Laboratory of the University of Louisville Medical Department and of the Louisville City Hospital.

JAMA. 1918;70(23):1751-1754. doi:10.1001/jama.1918.02600230021006
Abstract

The bibliography of the subject of postmortem Wassermann tests was covered in an article1 published in 1916. No further study of the subject was published in 1917 by any one. In the first article the reasons for doing postmortem complement fixation tests for syphilis were discussed and the technic was described in detail. The results of 290 tests were analyzed and the following conclusions deduced:

  1. Postmortem Wassermann reactions confirmed antemortem reactions in 95 per cent, of thirty-eight control cases. Positives were confirmed in serum six hours post-mortem and negatives in serum twenty-two hours post-mortem.

  2. In 90.4 per cent, of cases showing postmortem anatomic lesions of syphilis or presenting evidence of syphilis in their histories, the serums postmortem gave positive Wassermann reactions.

  3. The fact that positive postmortem reactions appeared in thirty-eight cases, which did not present postmortem lesions or historic evidence of syphilis and in which death was due to

×