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Article
June 15, 1918

THE PREDISPOSITION OF STREPTOCOCCUS CARRIERS TO THE COMPLICATIONS OF MEASLES: RESULTS OF SEPARATION OF CARRIERS FROM NON-CARRIERS AT A BASE HOSPITAL

Author Affiliations

(Baltimore) Captain, M. R. C., U. S. Army; (New York) Lieutenant, M. R. C., U. S. Army CAMP ZACHARY TAYLOR, LOUISVILLE, KY.

From the Medical and Laboratory Services, Base Hospital, Camp Zachary Taylor, Ky.

JAMA. 1918;70(24):1827-1830. doi:10.1001/jama.1918.26010240008008b
Abstract

It is evident from reports coming from various Army cantonments1 that measles, because of the severity and frequency of its complications, must be regarded as a serious camp disease. Complications necessitate long hospitalization and cause, therefore, a high noneffective rate; bronchopneumonia and empyema have been responsible for many deaths. With surprising uniformity, the complications have been due to infection with a hemolytic streptococcus.

In the report of a commission2 sent by the Surgeon-General of the Army to study the pneumonia at San Antonio, Texas, two significant facts concerning the relation of the streptococcus to the complications of measles were pointed out: First; a relatively small number of measles patients (11.4 per cent.) harbored this organism in their throats on admission to the hospital; second, many more acquired S. hemolyticus in their throats for the first time during their stay in the wards. It was therefore inferred that at

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