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Article
July 6, 1918

TRENCH FEVER: A REPORT OF CLINICAL OBSERVATIONS AND RESEARCH AS TO THE ETIOLOGY, PATHOLOGY, PROPHYLAXIS AND TREATMENT OF TRENCH FEVER AMONG TROOPS

Author Affiliations

HAMPSTEAD, ENGLAND

JAMA. 1918;71(1):21-26. doi:10.1001/jama.1918.26020270005007a
Abstract

The Acute Disease  The importance of trench fever lies in the fact that large numbers of soldiers, both officers and men, have suffered from it during the present war, and that though it is not fatal, the morbidity resulting from it on the western front exceeds that from any other disease. Those affected are in many instances permanently unable to resume their former duties, and some pass back to civil life incapacitated and a charge on the state. There is no evidence that the incidence of the disease is decreasing naturally, and some, in fact, that its virulence is tending to increase. From the knowledge of its mode of transmission at present available, there is every reason to suppose that, unless adequate measures are taken to prevent it, the disease may arise and spread wherever the body louse is prevalent, provided that men already infested are sent there from endemic

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