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Article
July 13, 1918

RUPTURE OF THE UTERUS THROUGH THE CESAREAN SECTION SCAR

Author Affiliations

BALTIMORE

From the Gynecological Department of Johns Hopkins University.

JAMA. 1918;71(2):105-106. doi:10.1001/jama.1918.02600280027007
Abstract

The number of cases of rupture of the uterus following cesarean section that had been reported up to 1913 was sixty-three, according to the exhaustive review of the literature published in that year by Findley.1 By 1916 the number had risen to seventy-four,2 and since then a number of other cases have been reported. The occurrence must, therefore, be looked on as relatively rare, so that it would seem to be worth while to put even a single case on record. Aside from the infrequency of rupture of the cesareanized uterus, I have been led to report the following case by certain rather unusual circumstances attending it, and also by its pertinence to the debate as to the correctness or incorrectness of the old dictum, "Once a cesarean, always a cesarean."

REPORT OF CASE 

History.  —A white woman, aged 19, had had a cesarean section performed, May 5,

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