[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
July 27, 1918

CARBON MONOXID POISONING: ITS NERVOUS AND MENTAL SYMPTOMS: REPORT OF CASE

JAMA. 1918;71(4):257-260. doi:10.1001/jama.1918.02600300021007
Abstract

McNally1 makes the somewhat surprising statement that "deaths from carbon monoxid poisoning in large cities now exceed those from any other poison." The total number of gas cases in Cook County, Ill., for 1916 was 501, nearly 8 per cent. of the entire number of coroner's cases. Much of the increase, of course, is a purposeful one, illuminating gas being an easily available means of suicide. Industrial and domestic sources are, however, not a few.

"The proportion of carbon monoxid differs greatly in domestic and industrial gases, varying between 4 and 30 per cent.—in coal gas, 4 to 10 per cent., and 30 per cent, in water gas, and 20 and 30 per cent, in producer gas—almost all illuminating gas containing a large proportion of water gas. Stoves, salamanders, furnaces, blast furnaces and gas engines are not infrequent sources of this poison. Increased use of gas in the winter

×