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Article
August 3, 1918

OIL OF CHENOPODIUM IN THE TREATMENT OF AMEBIC DYSENTERY: PRELIMINARY REPORT

Author Affiliations

Director of Uncinariasis Campaign; American Presbyterian Mission Hospital CHIENGMAI, SIAM

JAMA. 1918;71(5):350-352. doi:10.1001/jama.1918.02600310028008
Abstract

The treatment of amebic dysentery has always been a matter of considerable difficulty. A large number of drugs have been used at various times with varying degrees of success. As listed in Hare's "Practical Therapeutics," these drugs include arsenic, mercuric chlorid, copaiba, ergot, lead acetate, ipecac, opium and camphor, and magnesium sulphate; also enemas of boric acid, zinc phenolsulphonate, copper sulphate, a cresol preparation, hamamelis, quinin, and silver nitrate. Ipecac has gradually forged ahead of the other drugs, and its active principle, emetin, has been found to be extremely effective in acute amebiasis, when given hypodermically.

A careful perusal of current medical literature, however, shows that physicians working in tropical countries are apparently not satisfied with emetin. While excellent results have been obtained with it, it is by no means atoxic, and untoward symptoms and even deaths have been attributed to its administration.1 Moreover, there are cases of amebiasis

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