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Article
August 10, 1918

TREATMENT OF ACUTE POLIOMYELITIS WITH IMMUNE HORSE SERUM: FURTHER STUDIES

Author Affiliations

ROCHESTER, MINN.

From the Mayo Foundation

JAMA. 1918;71(6):433-438. doi:10.1001/jama.1918.02600320017006
Abstract

The demonstration that the somewhat peculiar streptococcus, isolated in poliomyelitis from time to time by various observers, has elective affinity for the central nervous system of young rabbits and guinea-pigs, producing symptoms and lesions resembling poliomyelitis in man,1 indicated that this organism was no longer to be regarded as a mere secondary invader, but of real etiologic importance.

The possibility of developing a curative serum for poliomyelitis with this organism was first suggested in the experiments by Rosenow, Towne and Wheeler,2 in which monkeys were protected against injections of virulent virus, and experiments in the immunization of horses were instituted. These fundamental observations stimulated a reinvestigation of the etiology of poliomyelitis and of its treatment.3

The serum from a horse (Horse 1), injected with freshly isolated strains from experimental poliomyelitis in monkeys, was found to protect monkeys against inoculation of virus4 (corroborated recently by Nuzum and

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