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August 10, 1918

ACUTE MASTOIDITIS AS A COMPLICATION OF INFECTIOUS DISEASES: BASED ON A STUDY OF ONE HUNDRED AND TWENTY-THREE CASES IN THE BASE HOSPITAL, CAMP SHELBY, MISS.

Author Affiliations

Major, M. R. C., U. S. Army MORRISTOWN, N. J.

JAMA. 1918;71(6):451-455. doi:10.1001/jama.1918.26020320011010b
Abstract

During the past winter the southern Army camps seem to have been invaded by a widespread streptococcus infection, expressing itself somewhat differently here and there; but in its most virulent form, and with highest mortality, in the shape of an involvement of the lung or pleura or both by the Streptococcus hemolyticus.

Camp Shelby was no exception to the general rule, but for unexplained reasons, which the epidemiologist must elaborate for us, the infection was not of the severest type, as there occurred only about 300 cases of pneumonia and thirty-five cases of empyema. However, in studying the streptococcus cases as a whole, a striking variation from the general rule is at once apparent, in that, among the empyemas, the hemolytic streptococcus is not the prevailing agent of infection. While there are a few due to this type of streptococcus, by far the larger number, as shown in the study

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