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Article
August 17, 1918

TYPHOID IN A COMPANY OF IMMUNIZED SOLDIERS

Author Affiliations

(New York) First Lieutenant, M. R. C., U. S. Army; Visiting Physician, City Hospital; Associate Visiting Physician and Chief of Cardiac Clinic, Gouverneur Hospital FRANCE

JAMA. 1918;71(7):532-534. doi:10.1001/jama.1918.26020330002011a
Abstract

The occurrence of four cases of typhoid fever in a company of 175 men (Company F, Eleventh Engineers, (Ry.), A. E. F.), who had been immunized but five months before the occurrence of the infection, is of enough interest to warrant a brief report. The available facts are not so complete and convincing as is desirable, especially as there is a bacteriologic discrepancy to be noted later. Despite this, it is hoped to emphasize the fact that, while an effort has been made to protect our soldiers from typhoid group infection by immunizing them, the six injections they received are not a guarantee that they will not contract one of these diseases.

Some persons do not develop immunity, or retain it a very short time, as is known from the not unusual second attack of typhoid, and in any event no soldier should abuse his immunity. Most of the men

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