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Article
August 31, 1918

PATHOLOGY OF THE EPIDEMIC STREPTOCOCCAL BRONCHOPNEUMONIA IN THE ARMY CAMPS

Author Affiliations

Contract Surgeon, U. S. Army BALTIMORE

JAMA. 1918;71(9):704-710. doi:10.1001/jama.1918.02600350008004
Abstract

In a previous paper1 a peculiar form of bronchopneumonia, caused by a hemolytic streptococcus and prevalent in some of the Army camps, was described. This was based on observations made during February and March at Fort Sam Houston, Texas. Since that time I have been able to study during May a quite similar epidemic at Camp Dodge, Iowa,2 where, however, the surrounding conditions, climate, housing of troops, and organization and construction of the base hospital were very different. Another striking difference lay in the great prevalence of measles in the Texas camp, whereas at Camp. Dodge measles has not been very common. In the Texas camp we were greatly impressed with the importance of measles as a disease predisposing to secondary invasion of the streptococcus, although we realized the possibility that other diseases, such as scarlet fever or lobar pneumonia, might act as predisposing causes, and that the

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