[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 18.207.255.49. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
September 28, 1918

THE PRINCIPLES OF TREATMENT IN MERCURIC CHLORID POISONING: WITH RESULTS OF TREATMENT

Author Affiliations

Lieutenant, M. R. C., U. S. Army; Instructor in Medicine, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine; Assistant Attending Physician, Cincinnati General Hospital CINCINNATI

From the Department of Medicine, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, and the Medical Clinic, Cincinnati General Hospital.

JAMA. 1918;71(13):1045-1047. doi:10.1001/jama.1918.02600390029008
Abstract

Within the past two years there has been much work done in the various phases of mercuric chlorid poisoning. Before then, most of the work reported was of a therapeutic nature; but recently, new and important laboratory data have been contributed. These new data have certainly put the modern therapeutic measures to the test, discrediting many and placing a few on a firm basis.

The anatomic pathology has been well established. Every organ of the body is affected, the liver and kidneys bearing the brunt of the injuries. From a cloudy swelling the changes continue to fatty degeneration and necrosis. When the poisoning is severe, hemorrhagic inflammation may supervene.

Schamberg, Kolmer and Raiziss,1 in their studies of the comparative toxicity of the various preparations of mercury used for therapeutic purposes, have shown in a long series of dogs that every animal develops, evidences of nephritis of varying degrees after

×