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Article
October 12, 1918

A STUDY OF DIPHTHERIA CARRIERS IN A MILITARY CAMP

Author Affiliations

(Washington, D. C.) Colonel, M. C., U. S. Army; (Chicago) Major, M. C., U. S. Army; (Philadelphia) Captain, M. C., U. S. Army CAMP DONIPHAN, FORT SILL, OKLA.

JAMA. 1918;71(15):1206-1213. doi:10.1001/jama.1918.26020410001008
Abstract

Writers on military hygiene have affirmed that diphtheria has never been of serious importance in the Army, for the reason that it is easily controlled. This opinion is not shared by the officers on duty at the Base Hospital, Camp Doniphan, since their experience has demonstrated that, under certain circumstances, an epidemic of the disease is exceedingly difficult to overcome.

During the early months of 1918 the control of diphtheria, with especial reference to the carriers of the disease, was a very serious problem, which for a long time seemed but little influenced by the strenuous efforts of the staff.

As shown in Chart 1, a few cases were constantly present from October, 1917, but it was not until the latter part of January, 1918, that the disease began to show a marked upward tendency. From that time it persisted, despite the most earnest efforts and carefully devised safeguards, for

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