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Article
October 19, 1918

INSANITY VERSUS MENTAL DISEASES: THE DUTY OF THE GENERAL PRACTITIONER IN PSYCHIATRIC DIAGNOSIS

JAMA. 1918;71(16):1259-1264. doi:10.1001/jama.1918.02600420001001
Abstract

The time has come when the general practitioner must assume responsibilities new to him: he must become as much a psychiatrist as he is specialist in other directions.1 But how specialistic, it may be asked, is the general doctor-man to be? Quien sabe? And times change. But so much is certain: The general doctor-man does not know as much about psychiatry either as he should know, or as he has command of, let us say, pediatrics, gynecology or dermatology. Science, C. S. Peirce defined, I believe, as the range of ignorance. Well, the general practitioner's range of ignorance re psychiatry is altogether too wide for his own conscience's comfort and disastrously wide for the good of society.

All this can now be shouted from housetops by reason of what the layman terms "shell shock," a problem for medicine no less wide than the whole of clinical neurology and psychiatry,

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