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Article
November 9, 1918

RAPID METHOD FOR DETECTION OF OVA OF INTESTINAL PARASITES IN HUMAN STOOLS

Author Affiliations

Major, Sanitary Corps, U. S. Army FORT SAM HOUSTON, TEXAS; Major, Sanitary Corps, U. S. Army CAMP JACKSON, COLUMBIA, S. C.

JAMA. 1918;71(19):1557-1561. doi:10.1001/jama.1918.26020450004011
Abstract

The military significance of infection by hookworm disease among recruits and troops of the United States Army might be inferred from its known clinical symptoms. That it is characterized by anemia, edema, intestinal disturbances and by a disinclination to physical effort is well known. Testimony and statistics add to these charges the facts that morbidity and mortality tend to be higher among troops from the area of hookworm infection than among those from outside that area. Comparisons of the records of examinations of new recruits from the hookworm area1 reveal the fact that white men with this infection make lower records than do the noninfected, literate and illiterate. There is also some evidence that hookworm infections tend to impede the progress of recruits in discipline and instruction. The guard house, venereal isolation camp and the hospital show higher rates of infection than does the camp as a whole. Hookworm

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