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Article
November 30, 1918

A PRELIMINARY REPORT OF A STUDY OF THE COAGULABILITY OF INFLUENZAL BLOOD

Author Affiliations

Cedar Rapids, Iowa.

JAMA. 1918;71(22):1847. doi:10.1001/jama.1918.02600480063021

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Abstract

To the Editor:  —During the recent influenza epidemic, one of the most striking symptoms was an almost constant occurrence of hemorrhage. Nosebleed was present nearly always in children, and often in adults. Some of the women had menorrhagia and metrorrhagia, and abortion was frequent. We observed one case with hemorrhage from the bladder and two with hemorrhage from the bowels. The cerebrospinal fluid contained blood in two cases in which lumbar puncture was performed for a suspected meningitis. Bleeding from the gums was common, and several young patients developed hemorrhagic purpura. A majority of the so-called pneumonia patients coughed up bright red blood, some of them dying suddenly from asphyxiation due to active hemorrhage. Sudden death came to one convalescent patient from what was, clinically at least, a hemorrhage in the brain.The regularity with which these various hemorrhages appeared suggested the possibility of there being a change in the

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