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Article
December 14, 1918

THE INFLUENZA EPIDEMIC IN CHICAGO: THE DISEASE AS A TYPE OF TOXEMIC SHOCK

Author Affiliations

Instructor, Department of Pharmacology and Therapeutics, University of Illinois College of Medicine; House Physician, Cook County Hospital; Instructor, Department of Ophthalmology, University of Illinois College of Medicine; Resident Physician, Cook County Hospital CHICAGO

JAMA. 1918;71(24):1962-1967. doi:10.1001/jama.1918.02600500012003
Abstract

The following report is based on the cases of influenza admitted to Cook County Hospital, and on personal observations and experience in their treatment. We believe a careful statistical report of those cases is valuable for two reasons: First, it will serve to correct and amplify many opinions and conclusions which physicians dealing with a more limited set of cases have formed; second, it will aid in understanding some pre-epidemic obscure cases. For about eighteen months the term "atypical pneumonia" has been frequently used to designate cases which did not conform to textbook descriptions, but which have been increasing in numbers. Some of these cases made their appearance in the hospital over one year ago, and in the spring of 1918 constituted many of the so-called lobar pneumonias. They were admitted to the hospital and discharged under varying diagnoses, as bronchopneumonia, capillary bronchitis and epidemic mixed infections. We now know

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