[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
December 14, 1918

THE FAILURE OF A BACTERIAL VACCINE AS A PROPHYLACTIC AGAINST INFLUENZA

Author Affiliations

Director, Hygienic Laboratory WASHINGTON, D. C.; Assistant Surgeon, United States Public Health Service; Intern, Stanford University Hospital SAN FRANCISCO

JAMA. 1918;71(24):1997. doi:10.1001/jama.1918.26020500023006i

This article is only available in the PDF format. Download the PDF to view the article, as well as its associated figures and tables.

Abstract

The necessity for accurate, controlled observations on preparations that are used as prophylactic agents for influenza is our reason for presenting the subjoined data.

The bacterial vaccine used in the present investigation was kindly furnished by Dr. F. O. Tonney, chief of the laboratory of the Chicago Health Department. While we are not intimately acquainted with the process of the preparation of the vaccine, we believe that it is an agent that should exhibit the immunizing properties, if any exist, of the micro-organisms used in its preparation.

Each cubic centimeter contains, approximately:

Two or more strains of each organism were used.

The dose used was 0.5 c.c. at the first injection, 1 c.c. at the second and 1.5 c.c. at the third. The interval between the injections was forty-eight hours.

The persons vaccinated were patients at a state institution for the insane. Only patients of 41 years of age or

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×