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Article
December 21, 1918

THE RELATION OF SANITATION AND DRAINAGE TO MALARIA

JAMA. 1918;71(25):2076. doi:10.1001/jama.1918.02600510044014
Abstract

In the scheme of disease prevention, sanitation is an essential factor; and in no disease has this been more decisively established than in malaria. Malaria flourishes chiefly in tropical or semitropical climates where drainage is defective, and consequently where conditions are propitious for the breeding of mosquitoes. The campaigns in eastern Europe have afforded excellent opportunities for emphasizing the force of this statement. In the Struma and Vardar valleys, consisting of marshy lands in which mosquitoes abound, malaria was extremely prevalent. Entente armies have been stationed there for years. The reclamation and drainage undertakings set in motion by British and French engineers have had the result already of destroying many of the mosquito breeding haunts and have decreased the prevalence of malaria. When the drainage plans have been completely carried out, these regions, which have been practically uninhabited for generations, will again become fruitful tracts of land able to support

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