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Article
January 25, 1919

EFFECT OF CARDIAC DISTRESS ON THE WORK OF RECRUITS

JAMA. 1919;72(4):249-252. doi:10.1001/jama.1919.02610040015005

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Abstract

Physically, an army, like a chain, is only as strong as its weakest part. Each individual link or element in the make-up of the soldier-to-be is examined by the orthopedic, neuropsychiatric, tuberculosis, cardiovascular, genito-urinary and other examiners. On their arrival at Camp Sherman, the recruits pass before the different examiners, and the manifestly unfit are rejected. The tuberculosis examiners make a cursory examination of the heart. The apparently normal are passed. Those showing any abnormality are referred to the cardiovascular examiners. Here they are examined more carefully, from ten to fifteen minutes, or more when necessary, being devoted to each case. As a rule about 3 per cent. are referred to this board, a varying number of whom are accepted. The organic valvular diseases give little trouble, as the rules governing this type of case are more or less definite. The same group of cases that offers trouble in the

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