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Article
March 1, 1919

THE COMPLEMENT FIXATION TEST IN INFLUENZAL PNEUMONIA: STUDIES WITH SERUM FROM CONVALESCENT PATIENTS, THE INFLUENZA BACILLUS BEING USED AS ANTIGEN

Author Affiliations

Lieutenant (Junior Grade) M. C., U. S. N. R. F. CHELSEA, MASS.

JAMA. 1919;72(9):633-636. doi:10.1001/jama.1919.02610090017004
Abstract

These experiments were performed to ascertain whether patients who had recovered from the bronchopneumonia accompanying influenza had developed antibodies that could be demonstrated by the complement fixation test, Bacillus influenzae being used as antigen.

During the recent epidemic in the First Naval District, attempts were made in this laboratory to demonstrate agglutinins, precipitins or opsonins in the blood of the patients who had the disease. The results so far have been negative with B. influenzae. This, indeed, was disappointing, as it was hoped that individuals who had recovered might show some demonstrable changes in the blood which would indicate the part the immune processes might have played in their recovery.

This expectation was especially strengthened in view of the highly suggestive results obtained by Drs. McGuire and Redden1 in their treatment of patients in the active stage of influenzal pneumonia with serum from patients who had recovered from the

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