[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
April 19, 1919

ANTHRAX IN A SOLDIER: REPORT OF A FATAL CASE PROBABLY DUE TO INFECTION BY A SHAVING BRUSH

Author Affiliations

Captain, M. C., U. S. Army; Chief of Laboratory; First Lieutenant, Sanitary Corps, U. S. Army CAMP JACKSON, COLUMBIA, S. C.

From the base hospital laboratory.

JAMA. 1919;72(16):1129-1131. doi:10.1001/jama.1919.02610160013004
Abstract

This is the third case of human anthrax at Camp Jackson in the past four months, the first two cases having been reported by Schultz.1 In this case anthrax bacilli were isolated from a shaving brush made of badger's or of an imitation of badger's hair, and recently purchased by the patient. The case is thought worthy of record because of the interesting pathology, especially the presence of intestinal carbuncles, which are usually associated with infection by the intestinal route, and the complete bacteriologic and chemical findings.

REPORT OF CASE 

History.  —Private J. B., white, aged 21, was admitted to the base hospital of Camp Jackson, Nov. 21, 1918, complaining of slight headache, dizziness and backache. The previous medical history was negative. The patient was well nourished. He was not acutely ill, having on the neck above the thyroid cartilage an inconspicuous swelling without inflammatory areola, about 1 cm.

×