[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
August 9, 1919

STUDIES IN INFLUENZA AND PNEUMONIAIV. FURTHER RESULTS OF PROPHYLACTIC INOCULATIONS

JAMA. 1919;73(6):396-401. doi:10.1001/jama.1919.02610320020005
Abstract

To determine the value of vaccination against disease, it is essential that the disease shall be one which a relatively large number of persons will develop unless protected, and that it be accompanied by serious consequences. These conditions were amply fulfilled during the pandemic of influenza. Moreover, the vaccine should contain the killed bacteria that produce symptoms and which are at least contributory to the cause of death. We have attempted, so far as possible, to fulfil this requirement by making a careful bacteriologic study of the disease, and by incorporating into the vaccine the important bacteria isolated. The epidemic was severe, and the need and the demand for vaccination were great; a large number of cases were available for bacteriologic study and to supply the proper strains for the vaccine. Vaccinations in large numbers during the past ten years with bacteria belonging to the group found in influenza have

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×