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October 4, 1919

PHYSICAL RECONSTRUCTION APPLIED IN THE TREATMENT OF PULMONARY TUBERCULOSIS

JAMA. 1919;73(14):1033-1035. doi:10.1001/jama.1919.02610400011004
Abstract

Physical reconstruction may be defined as continual treatment, carried to the fullest degree of maximum physical and functional restoration consistent with the nature of the disability of the patient, by the employment of all known measures of modern medical and surgical management, including curative, mental and manual work (in wards, workshops, schools, gardens and fields); physiotherapy (thermotherapy, electrotherapy, hydrotherapy and mechanotherapy, massage, calisthenics, gymnastics and the like), and sports, games and amusements indoors and outdoors.

The application of physical reconstruction in the treatment of soldiers disabled by illness and injury during the great war was a new policy of the Medical Department of the Army. The measure had a few advocates, some tolerant but doubtful friends, and many opponents in the medical department, including officers of the permanent military establishment and others holding temporary commissions.

The failure of many to recognize the therapeutic value of the measures enumerated is due

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