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Article
October 18, 1919

EARLY FUNCTION AFTER WAR WOUNDS OF THE EXTREMITIES

JAMA. 1919;73(16):1201-1202. doi:10.1001/jama.1919.02610420029010
Abstract

In injury or disease of the extremities, surgery is dealing with a motor. When a man injures an arm or a leg, what he is chiefly concerned about is the restoration of that motor to its previous functional capacity, or as near the original as possible. The patient is not interested in the methods employed, but in the recovery of a valuable motor. Theoretically, the surgeon is supposed to have the same point of view; but he has devoted more time to the methods of immediate surgical relief, and has not been thinking always in the terms of motor function. This is quite natural, because in surgery of the head and trunk the services of the surgeon are usually at an end after the completion of the operation. After the wound has healed he is more or less powerless in his attempts to exercise control over the function of the

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