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Article
November 1, 1919

RECONSTRUCTION WORK IN WAR INJURIES OF THE FACE AND JAWS

JAMA. 1919;73(18):1337-1339. doi:10.1001/jama.1919.02610440017005
Abstract

As has been pointed out many times before, the successful treatment of maxillofacial injuries depends on teamwork between the surgeon, the dental surgeon and the dental prosthetist. We desire to outline the practical application of this cooperation at the Walter Reed General Hospital.

The patients arriving from overseas belong, in general, to the following groups:

  1. Compound comminuted fracture of the mandible in process of consolidation. These may or may not have been splinted before arrival, and require observation until union is complete.

  2. Compound comminuted fracture with delay in union and healing of the soft parts due to the presence of sequestrums, infected teeth in or near the line of fracture, foreign bodies, etc. These require incision and drainage, removal of sequestrums, teeth, foreign bodies, etc., and general treatment of sepsis, in addition to splinting.

  3. United fracture with loss of substance. In many of these cases the tissues have

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