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Article
November 1, 1919

RECONSTRUCTION AND AFTER-CARE OF OLD UNREDUCED POTT'S FRACTURES

JAMA. 1919;73(18):1342-1344. doi:10.1001/jama.1919.02610440022007
Abstract

The most frequent disability following in the wake of Pott's fractures is flat foot. This is often exaggerated and rendered painful and persistent by a slight posterior displacement of the foot on the tibia or a widening of the ankle joint, due to a rupture of the tibiofibular ligament. Of course, there is a large percentage of Pott's fractures in which the tibiofibular ligament is not ruptured. These will have a normal ankle joint mortise. There is another factor in the reduction of a flat foot. Often after a Pott's fracture the foot is put up at right angles but in valgus position, and the muscles which support the arch of the foot are put on the stretch, the patient is allowed to walk in the support with the foot in this faulty position and a flat foot develops, the result, largely of loss of muscle tone.

In the treatment

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