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Article
November 8, 1919

THE FUNDAMENTAL PHYSIOLOGIC REACTION IN ANAPHYLACTIC AND PEPTONE SHOCKPRELIMINARY REPORT

JAMA. 1919;73(19):1437. doi:10.1001/jama.1919.02610450033009

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Abstract

The causes of the remarkable differences in the manifestations of anaphylactic and peptone shock in different animals has been the subject of no little speculation. In the dog, anaphylactic and peptone shock are characterized by a marked immediate fall in arterial blood pressure, a simultaneous fall in venous (external jugular-superior vena cava) pressure, a rise in portal pressure, an increase in the volume of the liver, and, at least in peptone shock, an increased flow of lymph from the thoracic duct. It is evident, therefore, that in the dog, the flow of blood through the liver is greatly impeded in these conditions. The exact location of the obstruction has not heretofore been determined.

In reasoning from these facts it appeared that the only possible location for an obstruction that would explain all of them was not the extrahepatic splanchnic area, nor the portal vein and its intrahepatic branches, nor the

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