[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
November 22, 1919

A CONSIDERATION OF SOME OF THE PROBLEMS PRESENTED BY AMPUTATIONS

JAMA. 1919;73(21):1585-1590. doi:10.1001/jama.1919.02610470021008
Abstract

Apart altogether from the psychologic factors pertaining to amputation cases, the desire of some to stay indefinitely in comfortable quarters, the effort of some to get all that is "coming to them," the anxiety of others to secure a "square deal," the personality of the individual, and other similar difficulties that will not be considered in this paper, the chief problems relate themselves to (1) the stump and (2) the artificial appliance to be used as a substitute for the member lost.

Up to the present time we have had slightly more than 3,000 amputations to deal with in the Canadian army medical corps.

The policy of the government has been to treat all amputation cases in a central depot, and to supply them with artificial limbs from a government controlled and operated factory in the same center, with subsidiary plants, to take care of alterations and repairs, in strategic

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×