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December 20, 1919

TYPHOID FEVER IN THE AMERICAN ARMY DURING THE WORLD WAR

JAMA. 1919;73(25):1863-1864. doi:10.1001/jama.1919.02610510001001

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Abstract

It has now become possible to compile the statistics for typhoid and the paratyphoid fevers for the period of the great war. The figures for the year 1917 were published in the last annual report of the Surgeon-General; and the figures for 1918 will soon be ready for publication. I am permitted to select the compilations presented here from the forthcoming report because of their immediate interest.

In Hawaii, during September, 1917, there was a water-borne epidemic of typhoid of the classic type, giving the first opportunity since the introduction of vaccination into the Army for a comparison of the rates among the vaccinated and unvaccinated. The

infectious material was traced to a Japanese laborer who had been employed, until he was taken sick, in the construction work on the water supply system.

The salient facts in this water-borne epidemic of the classic type are set forth in Table 1.

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