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Article
December 20, 1919

DRAINAGE OF THE ABDOMINAL WALL IN ACUTE APPENDICITIS

JAMA. 1919;73(25):1871-1873. doi:10.1001/jama.1919.02610510009005
Abstract

Every surgeon is familiar with the fact that a more or less extensive infection between the layers of the abdominal wall frequently complicates an operation for the removal of the acutely inflamed appendix. One would, of course, expect suppuration in cases of appendical abscess or of spreading1 peritonitis; but that it may occur even when there is no visible sign of a spread of the infection beyond the walls of the appendix is not generally appreciated. Not infrequently one sees extensive infection of the abdominal wall in cases in which a gangrenous or very acutely inflamed appendix had been removed without drainage of either the peritoneal cavity or of the abdominal wall. The former will take care of the infection, as a rule, in such cases; but the muscular, aponeurotic and fatty tissues of the abdominal wall possess a far lower degree of resistance, and within the first week,

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